Tuesday, December 12, 2017

GIRL GANGS, BKER BOYS AND REAL COOL CATS

Looks like I have a bit of a milk moustache but it's part of the appropriately psychedelic-tinged mood lighting used at the launch of GIRL GANGS, BKER BOYS AND REAL COOL CATS at the Grub Street Bookshop last night. I am reading a passage from Ray Stanley's lurid 1970 paperback novel THE HIPPY CULT MURDERS, one of the Charles Manson-influenced titles which I write about in the book.


Getting my first look at the completed book, it looks stunning. A fantastic achievement that I am proud to have contributed to.



A peek at some of my contributions to the book.

MELBOURNE MOVIE MARKET

Hanging out with my lovely helper at the Movie Market at the Astor last Saturday afternoon. Considering I was selling mostly toys, it seemed fitting to take the table by the Christmas Tree. This Movie Market was a little bit quieter than the last few, possibly due to it being so close to Christmas. You can never predict these things. But as always we had a fun afternoon talking to people, and meeting friends old and new. Having Marneen there with me certainly helped make it a lot more fun, and still managed enough sales to make it more than worthwhile. Another great effort from organizer Stuart Simpson.





Friday, December 1, 2017

MANSON MEETS HIS MAKER

“CHARLES MANSON DEAD”


In recent years, I started wondering if I would ever live long enough to actually read those words. After cheating the executioner when the death penalty was revoked in California in 1972, Charles Manson would go on to outlive not only the man who first walked on the Moon just a couple of weeks before he sent his “Family” out on their unbelievably vicious killing spree, but the prosecutor who successfully had him sentenced to death in the first place. Manson the man was starting to appear as in-killable as the myth.

I was too young in 1969 to remember or have even been aware of the case, but I was at exactly the right age to be terrified and haunted by it when the HELTER SKELTER TV mini-series first aired in Australia in 1976. The mini-series of course was accompanied by ample TV and newspaper coverage looking back at the real-life case which it was based on, and though I was already a burgeoning film buff it was the first time in my young life that the lines between reel horror and real horror became intertwined and blurred. To a twelve-year-old boy, it was absolutely a horror story and a true nightmare that stuck with me and kept me awake at night for a long time.


Over the ensuing years I have read (and collected) more Manson-related books and magazines and watched more movies and documentaries on the subject than I could ever possibly remember, and have also written several published pieces relating to the case (mostly regarding the movies influenced by it). Though I am fascinated with the case mostly from its psychological angle and the impact it has had on history’s perception of the 1960s, I still grapple with understanding that fear that was ingrained in me while sitting in front of the family TV set back in 1976.

Though Manson himself was never actually convicted of murdering anybody, he was just as responsible and guilty as the people who actually drew blood on his command. I can never celebrate anyone’s death, but I hold no sympathy for Manson upon his passing. He not only enjoyed a bizarre celebrity status behind bars but got to live decades longer than all of those who were killed in his name, and he got to die in a lot more peaceful and compassionate manner also. Most would say that was a lot better than he deserved.



FANATICAL FANDOM


Eckhart Schmidt’s 1982 West German thriller DER FAN (THE FAN) would have to rate as one of the unsung European genre masterpieces from the eighties. The film does have it supporters, and it has recently received a lovely Blu-ray/DVD release from Mondo Macabro, so it is not a total obscurity, but nor is it as anywhere near as well-known as it deserves to be. I myself was pretty much unaware of the movie until I read a compelling review of it by Michelle Alexander, who was kind enough to lend me the Mondo Macabro disc, which I sat down to watch last night and was instantly drawn into and mesmerized by.
Starring Désirée Nosbusch in a compelling and beautifully detached performance, DER FAN tells the story of Simone, a teenage girl obsessed by the idea of meeting and falling in love with her idol, a mysterious and somber experimental new wave/pop singer known only as R (played by Bodo Steiger). Failing at school because her thoughts are dominated completely by R, when her continual stream of love letters to R go unanswered, Simone’s intense fan-ish obsession begins to tilt over into stalker territory, as she leaves home and hitches to Munich, where R is scheduled to appear on a pop music television show. When Simone finally comes face to face with her true love, she is brought into R’s inner circle but soon learns the old lesson that it’s sometimes better to keep your idols at arm’s length, as things take an unexpectedly dark and very twisted turn in the final act.
From the moment the opening credits appear against  bright red background, the first two acts of DER FAN pops with a beautifully slick early-eighties style that clearly reflects the burgeoning music video landscape of the day, and the soundtrack (provided by German group Rheingold) makes for some excellent Euro new wave listening. As the themes of the film turn darker in it’s final third, so too does the colour palette diminish and things become more stark and shadowy, and the music more unnerving. On paper the sudden tonal shift would sound jarring but under Schmidt’s assured direction the transition works beautifully, making the climax of the film a true surprise.
DER FAN works on so many levels – as a thriller, a horror film, a musical document and a compelling look at the dangerous extremes of fandom. It’s an ultimately sick but oddly moving gem, and one which is absolutely worth unearthing and admiring.